Gallery Mint Museum ScrapBook  
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Gallery Mint Museum Box706 EurekaSprings AR 72632 
OrderDesk:(888)558-MINT(6468)     Questions:(479)253-5055 
Website:www.gallerymint.com    EMail:GalleryMintMuseum

I absolutely LOVE your idea of creating this scrapbook.
This is a great way of answering questions that come up a lot. 
Ron Landis ...Sun, 30 Jul 2000 11:59:06
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2003
ScrapBook Subjects
Page
Index
Links
Link: Newark Museum Press Setup Strike
Link: Precious Bits Of Flotsam...
Link: [ How Many Hobos Can Dance On The Head Of A Nail? ]
Link: [ The Head of A Screw Makes An Interesting Canvas! ]
Link: It's Back... Real Gold Creations Are Beautiful!
Link: 1804 Double Struck Dollar On A Silver Strip
Link: [ New Maris Plates Added To Notre Dame's Website ]
Link: Newark Museum Tokens In Silver And Pewter
Link: Struck On A Blank Clad Ike Dollar Planchet
Link: Fifteen Years Have Passed
Link: [ You Want How Much For Postage&Handling? ]
Enlargement scans available on WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM. 
Up Next!   Link:Go there NOW!
Click to 'Go there Now!'
Growth Fund Benefit Auction ...Part I
Coming Soon!   Link:Go there NOW!
Click to 'Go there Now!'
Treasure Trove ...Pages ONE and TWO
11/30
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  • Newark Museum Press Setup Strike

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       When I asked Timothy if they had any pewter tokens struck from the Newark Museum dies before they took the screw press to New Jersey, he told me that he had just melted the remainders back into raw pewter. Then when I was back in Eureka Springs on my next trip I saw a single token laying in a plastic sack on the office mail table. Ron said it wasn't being held for anything special that he knew of so I could have it.
       What is interesting with this specimen is that it clearly is a "press setup" strike. You can see that the obverse die and the reverse die hadn't yet been aligned properly when this token was struck. The obverse/hammer die is off-center while the reverse/anvil die isn't which is what one would expect since the planchet was laid on the reverse/anvil die.
       It is always a great experience when I go and visit TheGuys in Eureka Springs! EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

    11/28
    c.1991 Texas Renaissance Festival
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    TwoHeaded 'Royal Mint' Dragon Die Trial
    Struck uniface on a type'1' pewter planchet.
  • Precious Bits Of Flotsam...

  •         ...Cast Up By The Tides Of Time.
       It has been way too long since I last acquired any sort of pre-GMM 'Royal Mint' specimens to add to my collection. Timothy came up with these three insignificant pieces from some crook or cranny when he was cleaning up the other day. They may have been nothing special to TheGuys but they are absolutely enthralling to the Ol'FatMan. I hope you find them interesting as well.
       The TwoHeaded Dragon die (above) is the reverse die for the 400th Anniversary Medal, Elizabethan Renaissance Era 1589-1620 -by Royal Mint (RonLandis.) We have seen three other specimens that were struck with this die in SBsubjects: 1) Link:Property of GMM MintMaster and 2) Link:Wisdom Faith Courage. The Pan/Tree Demo dies used for the demonstration medal (below) have been seen before in SBsubject: 1) Link:The Road To Perfection and the Pan (obverse) die was used to create the understrike on the Segovia/Windjammer die trial shown in SBsujbect: 2) Link:A Complicated And Interesting Numismatic Specimen. Finally... the Good For $1 TRF dies (below) have had extensive discussion/study in the following SBsubjects: 1) Link:Good For $1 In Trade...Royal Mint, 2) Link:Texas Renaissance Festival Tokens and 3) Link:Texas Renaissance Festival 'Roller Mill Mint'. There are three different $1 token die sets and one $2 token die set on Ron's TRF roller dies.
       I'm certainly not doing these specimens justice... each deserves its own SBsubject ...but they came as a group and I hated to split them up. They have been 'together' for a long time now... over a decade already. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
    c.1991 Texas Renaissance Festival
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    Pan/Tree Demonstration Medal
    HotStruck by hand on crude silver planchet.
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    Good For $1 In Trade Die Trial
    Rolled with a 1984-D Lincoln Cent
    Click for TwoHeaded Dragon, Pan/Tree Demo or Good For $1 enlargement on CD-ROM
    Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
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    How Many Hobos Can Dance On The Head Of A Nail?
       When I get the urge to carve another nail I'll get a smaller but softer metal nail and do a better job. I can carve 2-3 hours before I've got to sharpen gravers when I'm carving buffalo nickels. Nailheads dull them in 2-3 minutes. I did find out by carving a nailhead that my gravers are too large for small carvings so I'm going to make a few small ones up. William Jameson... Sunday, November 16, 2003 3:40PM
    Click for Hand, ScrewHead or Completed enlargement on CD-ROM
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    The Head of A Screw Makes An Interesting Canvas!
       Very shortly after Bill sent me the scan of his nail carving another minature carving scan arrived in my INBOX... the darker scan in the center. I thought Bill was finished with his carving experiment until a couple days later I got the modified screw carving scan shown on the right.
       I'm finished with the nails and screws. I may carve a hobo on a pinhead one day. William Jameson... Tuesday, November 18, 2003 11:50AM
       I have to say that my life is richer every day thanks to my association with talented people like Bill Jameson and the other fantastic nickel carvers that it is my priviledge to know. Now where did I put that pin? I gotta send it to Bill! EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
    11/19
    A Mark Honea photograph.       Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
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  • It's Back... Real Gold Creations Are Beautiful!

  •    eBay item 2204850187 (Ends Nov-29-03 13:47:38PST) - Gallery Mint 1787 Brasher Dubloon - COPY. This is a Gallery Mint Museum COPY of a 1787 Gold Brasher Dubloon. Ephraim Brasher was a goldsmith in New York (and a neighbor of George Washington), who produced gold coins, as well as testing and guaranteeing the value of foreign gold coins. Most were counterstamped with his initials "EB". This piece is unusual in that it IS NOT stamped with Brasher's initials. As with all Gallery Mint products, it is struck on a planchet of the same specifications (26.5 grams of 22 karat gold), and using the same technology as that available to the early U.S. Mint (i.e., on a Screw Press). Gorgeous Uncirculated! classiccoins... Nov-19-03 13:47:38PST
       This wonderful solid gold Landis creation was last seen on eBay in August of 2002. We archived it in SBsubject Link:Missed It By THAT Much! and noted the interesting fact that it missed receiving an "EB" counterstamp. Here is your chance to purchase this wonderful specimen... go for it! EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

    11/18
    A Clifford Bolling photograph.       Click for Expanded and Enlarged view on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
  • 1804 Double Struck Dollar On A Silver Strip

  •    After a week or more of tantalizing tidbits under construction in the GMM Scrapbook, finally the Growth Fund Benefit Auction webpage is complete. Great stuff! I can hardly wait for more... and the CD with the entire auction list. Keep up the great work!
       Mike Ellis mentioned that he thought the 1804 Double Strike error might be unique, but I have one too. It is the 1804 $1 struck on the coin strip. I'm pretty sure it wasn't intended to be a double strike, but it is. Does it count if it was struck on a strip?? Clifford D. Bolling... Tuesday, November 18, 2003 8:14AM

       Cliff... your piece does and does not meet the criteria! LOL! Verne... maybe you should change the verbiage on Lot#8 to read that this is the only one known other than one on a trial strike on a silver metal strip. Mike Ellis... Tuesday, November 18, 2003 10:19AM
       We saw Cliff's silver dollar strip back in October of 2000 in SBsubject Link:If Strips Of Chicken Are Called "Chicken Fingers"... and the double striking was not a pi鑓e de caprice. Cliff just asked for 1796 and 1804 dollar die trials on a silver strip. I clearly remember him being quite surprised when the 1804 impression arrived double struck. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
    New Maris Plates Added To Notre Dame's Website
       We looked at Maris Plate 3 from... Link:The Coins of Colonial and Early America, A Project of the Robert H. Gore, Jr. Numismatic Endowment University of Notre Dame, Department of Special Collections, by Louis Jordan ...in SBsubject Link:Nagy, Maris, NJNS Lot#7 And The Real GMM Deerhead.
       If you are reading this from a Gallery Mint Museum ScrapBook CD-ROM, you can use the following links to view Plate-I: Link:Upper Left, Link:Upper Right, Link:Lower Left and Link:Lower Right quadrant scans. Otherwise you'll need to go to the links in the website excerpt I've provided for you below and click on the links to Notre Dame's stored images. Be warned... they are HUGE files and take considerable time to download to your computer. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
    New Jersey Copper Die Variety Charts 1786-1788
    by Roger Moore, M.D. [revised Sept. 8, 2003]
    { an extract from Link:A Listing of Die Variety Charts }
    A sample of 1787 obverses from Plate-I     Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
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    Maris Plate-I: A number of charts exist showing the numerous NJ obverse and reverse die varieties and their known pairings. However, the chart which has withstood the test of time and still serves as the primary reference for identifying NJ coppers is a photograph which appeared in 1881 as part of the classic book, A Historical Sketch of the Coins of New Jersey, written by Edward Maris, MD. A copy of this photograph, which measures 14 3/4 inches by 19 1/8 inches, broken down into four quadrants can be viewed by clicking below:
    Link:Upper left quadrant   Link:Upper right quadrant
    Link:Lower left quadrant   Link:Lower right quadrant
    The Maris 1881 photograph is called the Maris plate-I photograph and is a picture of an actual plate made up of the know die varieties of the NJ coins using real coins, electrotypes of coins and possibly photographs of coins. Each die variety is indicated by a specific number (for the obverse dies) or letter (for the reverse dies). The die combinations are shown by ligature lines draw between the relevant obverse and reverse dies. Once the Maris plate-I was photographed, it was disassembled and no know portion of this plate is know to exist at this time.
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    A sample of 1787 obverses from Plate-I     Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
    Maris Plate-II: A second plate exists, which consists of 140 NJ electrotypes soldered onto a zinc sheet measuring 18 inches by 24 inches and which is very similar to the Maris plate-I in regard to the NJ die varieties used and their arrangement on the plate. This plate which is called the Maris plate-II is believed to have been made sometime between 1881 and 1900 by Dr. Maris and it presently resides in the New Jersey Historical Society. In spite of the similarities between the Maris plate-I and Maris plate-II, a number of differences do exist. The most important differences include showing the "21-R" die combination with the addition of a new ligature line, as well as having a rearrangement of the coin images in order to show the die combinations of the "83-gg" (the "gg" was later changed to "ii"), and the "blank obverse-u". None of these die combinations were known when the photograph of the Maris plate-I was published. Four quadrant photographs of the Maris plate-II can be viewed by clicking below: The following four images are used with permission from the Maris Plate-II in the Collection of the New Jersey Historial Society (Accession number 1953.44).
    Link:Upper left quadrant   Link:Upper right quadrant
    Link:Lower left quadrant   Link:Lower right quadrant
    Maris Plate-III: A third plate made up of a zinc sheet with 140 electrotypes of NJ die varieties soldered to it which was made by Dr. Maris presently exists in a private collection. It was made at some point after the Maris plate-II. The primary difference in the Maris plate-III, compared to the Maris plate-II, is the rearrangement of the electrotypes in the lower left quadrant in order to allow for a better representation of the "21-R" die combination. In the 1940s a photographer names Steven Nagy made four photographs of the Maris plate-III representing each quadrant. Sets of these photographs are occasional available for purchase and one set (in the CNLF photofiles), which has been written on in a number of places to make corrections, can be viewed by clicking below:
    Link:Upper left quadrant   Link:Upper right quadrant
    Link:Lower left quadrant   Link:Lower right quadrant
    A more complete description of the three Maris plates is available in an article, "The Maris Plates", by Roger Moore MD and Dennis Wierzba, published in The Colonial Newsletter, vol. 43, number 2, August 2003, sequential page 2495-2527.

    Images of Selected NJ Varieties from Maris 10-78 From the C4 Photofiles Angel Pietri has provided color obverse and reverse images of selected New Jersey varieties in Maris number order, starting with Link:Maris 10-G. Attributions have been updated and corrected by Ray Williams in an e-mail of Sept. 10, 2003. The number following the Maris attribution is the C4 photo number. Thus Maris-10-G-1093 represents a New Jersey Maris 10-G combination, which is inventoried as image 1093 in the C4 Photofile.
    11/3
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    Pewter Token - 23.2-23.6mm - 5.2g - Reeded Edge       Screw Press - restored by the Gallery Mint Museum
  • Newark Museum Tokens In Silver And Pewter

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       Isn't it wonderful what happens when you give one of Ron's dies enough metal to fill in all the detail he endues his engravings with? I have used extra bandwidth here to provide you with the above scan simply because it is such a magnificant example of Ron's die work. I am posting scans below of both the silver and pewter regular production tokens struck on TheGuy's screwpress.
       Last week I shared what details I had about these 2003 Newark Museum tokens in SBsubject Link:Once Upon A Dime. I am now in contact with a fellow on the museum's staff and he has sent us photographs of TheGuy's screwpress as installed in their exhibit. He tells me that both the silver and pewter tokens are available for purchase in their museum gift shop.
       For those of you who are accessing the ScrapBook from our CD-ROM you can see a closeup here of a Image:second pewter token, 23.4-23.9mm - 5.2g - Reeded Edge, with an odd planchet defect on the reverse ...and... while I am at it I might as well show you again the two silver die trials below the production run tokens so you can compare them. The production tokens are noticeably, albeit only slightly... approximately 1.5mm ...larger than the trial tokens.
    Click for Silver or Pewter enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROMEnlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    Silver(left) - 23.2-23.6mm - 7.0g - Reeded Edge       Pewter(right) - 23.2-23.6mm - 5.2g - Reeded Edge
    Click for 1st Trial or 2nd Trial enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    Silver - Die Trials - 21.5mm(1st) 22.0mm(2nd) - 5.0g(1st) 5.1g(2nd) - Plain Edges
       I rebuilt these scans so they are as close as I can make them to the correct relative proportions of the actual tokens. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

    As a special bonus to all who purchase ScrapBook CD-ROMs...
    ...six pictures of the Newark Museum ScrewPress Display:
    First... a couple shots from the bow... Image:First and Image:Second.
    Next... two shots from the Image:Port and Image:Starboard quarters.
    Followed by... a shot of the Image:Making Money informational display.
    Finally... a closeup shot of the Image:Machine Struck Coins panel in that display.

    11/2
    A Clifford Bolling photograph.       Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
  • Struck On A Blank Clad Ike Dollar Planchet

  •    Just got my new 1796 $1 struck on a blank clad Ike dollar planchet. They used Obv 6/Rev 7, the only specimen I have with either of those dies. Pretty neat piece, this one even has the lettered edge, which my similarly struck 1794 $1 does not have. Both show a weak strike, I suspect because the clad planchet is significantly harder than the silver used normally. I don't seem to be able to get the color right in the photos, but both look really neat on clad planchets. The brilliant luster seems to refract differently than the silver.
       I just found out that Fred Weinberg is selling clad Ike planchets for $165! I still have a few that I picked up for less than $40 a while back. I guess that makes these pieces worth more than they used to be...?? Keep up the good work on the Scrapbook! It is a fine work and will be a standard reference for a long time. Clifford D. Bolling... Saturday, November 01, 2003 8:06PM

       I always look forward to EMail messages from Cliff... he wanders off into the most interesting numismatic byways and is generally deep into his study of GMM dies and die combinations. Sometimes I get a headache trying to compare my specimens to his studies but we both sure have a lot of fun... almost like we had good sense even though we both know we don't. ;-) EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
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    A Clifford Bolling photograph.       Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM

    11/1
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    HOT struck Silver - 29.2-30.2mm(left) 28.2-30.2mm(center/right) - 15.8g(left) 15.7g(center/right) - Plain Edge
  • Fifteen Years Have Passed

  •    It was 1988 when Ron Landis created one-half ounce hot struck silver medals to commemorate the 500th Anniversary, 1492-1992, of the Segovia Mint in Spain. The specimens that went to Spain were stolen... which I found particularly disheartening. Ron and I put our thinking caps on and decided to replace the stolen medals for the Segovia Mint Museum collection with a limited edition strike of new medals using the original dies as a basis. Ron added "03" below the "88" and did some other small modifications and detail enhancement on the dies so that these 2003 medals would not be mistaken for the original 1988 pieces. That way the value of the original issue medals would not be diminished and we would have a few new pieces for Landis/Segovia fans.
       I watched Timothy heat each planchet red hot and place them on the obverse die, which was the "anvil die," and then Joe struck each medal with the appropriate reverse die, which was the "hammer die." Only 10 sets of PROJECT (English) and PROYECTO (Spanish) medals were struck. That was a lot of work! I can't imagine attempting to create a run of a hundred or a thousand medals... Oh My!
       So... I packaged up and sent three medals to the Segovia Mint, one English and two Spanish pieces. That way Glenn Murray can display the set the same way you see in the scan above... English-Reverse_Common-Obverse_Spanish-Reverse. The specimens shown in the scan are the absolute best specimens from the production run.
       The process of hand striking HOT Silver medals is not for the faint of heart and the process does not lend itself well to a final product that looks like those perfect pieces TheGuys create with their screw presses. You can see these medals do not show full die detail nor are they precisely centered. You hit the hammer die and take what you get. Joe and Timothy did a fantastic job regardless! The handmade character of these specimens is a large part of their charm. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

    As a special bonus to all who purchase ScrapBook CD-ROMs...
    ...enlarged scans of the 2003 Segovia 1/2 ounce Silver medals:
    Image:The English version medal with the best reverse strike.
    This medal used for the left PROJECT reverse shown above.
    HOT struck Silver - 29.2-30.2mm - 15.8g - Plain Edge
    Image:The Spanish version medal with the best reverse strike.
    This medal used for the center MUSEO obverse and right PROYECTO reverse shown above.
    HOT struck Silver - 28.2-30.2mm - 15.7g - Plain Edge
    Image:The 2003 Segovia medal with the best obverse strike... English or Spanish.
    Better centered obverse strike than the previous medal but that scan turned out sharper so I used it.
    In fact, this PROYECTO medal has the best centered obv/rev combination of the entire production run.
    HOT struck Silver - 28.1-29.5mm - 15.8g - Plain Edge
    Bobbie
    A Clifford Kraft photograph.       Click for Enlargement on CD-ROM
    Enlargements available on both WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM
    -by Clifford Kraft
      You Want How Much For Postage&Handling?  
       In most cases I have no problem identifying the boys from the girls. "In most cases"... but at times even the most highly trained persons with years of experience may doubt their own judgements. In the case of "Bobbie," my childhood sweetheart, and one of the prettiest girls in my school (a very small school, where a lot of girls over six foot just aren't considered attractive.) You must remember that even though she held down a full time job as foreman of the Hog Kill Line at our local packing plant, she still went on to get degrees in Veterinary Medicine and Taxidermy. It was nice to know that if you brought your sick puppy to "Bobbie," would get it back (one way or another.)
       I don't know why it's always at this time of year (Halloween) that I think of her and her (through no fault of her own) extremely ugly sister. "They were twins you know." Bobbie was the cute one, if you ever saw them together you would know what I mean. I believe it was when she did her impersonations of Dracula or the Hulk that the word chromosomes entered your mind, but now with all the tests back we know where to take our puppyies and send our Valentines. Cliff Kraft... Sunday, October 26, 2003 4:34PM

       Alas, the love of my life has forsaken me for a life of Pea Fowl hunting in the Kansa Territories. She said she felt it better this way, as the meat of these birds, as-well-as their mounted remains could be sold at a roadside stands, and she knew of an intersection where everyone seemed to meet. "I believe the seven plus inches of snow we received may have push the matter along." She didn't seem to care 'What Brown Could Do For Her,' and decided to give the U.S.Postal people a try. I really wanted to, and probably will still, use a picture of her on a card with the caption "YOU WANT HOW MUCH FOR P&H?" Cliff Kraft... Thursday, October 30, 2003 1:21AM
       Here we have another nice nickel carving from my friend Cliffy. As all good engravings should, this one speaks for itself. Not only that... this one is just plain fun! It has been my experience that all the really superlative nickel carvings have a personality all their own. Thanks for creating this neat specimen Cliff.
       By the way... this carving brings to mind another fun carving Arthur Hutchison did for this holiday season many years ago... we call him "PunkinHead" but he really is a nice fellow despite his looks. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
    PunkinHead
    AKA Jack O. Lantern

    -by Arthur Hutchison
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