Gallery Mint Museum ScrapBook  
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Gallery Mint Museum ~ Box706 EurekaSprings AR 72632
OrderDesk...(888)558-MINT(6468)     Questions...(479)253-5055
 Website...www.gallerymint.com       EMail...GalleryMintMuseum
I absolutely LOVE your idea of creating this scrapbook.
This is a great way of answering questions that come up a lot.
Ron Landis ...Sun, 30 Jul 2000 11:59:06

2004 ScrapBook Subjects
Page
Index
Links
Link: Expanded 1792 Series
Link: 2004 "Mercury Dime" In High Relief
Link: Museum Project Well Underway
Link: Continental Dollars and Bar Cents Available!
Link: Landis 2004 GNA Demonstration Carving
Link: Mini-MiniMint Equipment and Tokens
Link: V-Dubya's Latest Puzzle
Enlargement scans available on WWW and ScrapBook CD-ROM. 
7/24
2004
Expanded 1792 Series
   Here are the details on the expanded 1792 pattern series... When we began the project we intended to use only the better known of the 1792 dated patterns. We have now completed that set and we now have display boxes for the original 5-piece set with airtight holders available.
   We have had many requests for more of the 1792 patterns and are pleased to announce limited edition reproductions of the rest of the known 1792 patterns. You do not need these to complete your 1792 sets but if you want to expand it, these are highly recommended as they represent some of the United States most rare and coveted coinage.
   Available now are the first three of a total of eight new offerings... each a limited edition of 100. They are the 1792 No Center Cent (the silver center cent with only a hole instead of the silver in the center), the 1792 Solid Copper Cent (same as the silver center cent only there is no hole and no center and it is solid copper), and the 1792 Solid Billon Cent (nearly identical to the solid copper version only a little lighter in color as the composition of this one calls for 5% silver!)
   The original billon cent was an experiment to combine 3/4 cent worth of silver with 1/4 cent worth of copper as an easier alternative to the bi-metal silver center cent. The solid copper version was made for comparison to this, and it was finally determined to be too close in color to pure copper, and the silver center cent too time consuming to produce, so the idea of using precious metal in this small denomination coin was aborted and the solid copper large cent was put into regular production the following year. The reproduction billon cents are marked with a small "B" on the reverse side.

   Fair Warning on Limited Editions... Total mintage will only be 100 each of the additional 1792 pattern reproductions. The three shown and discussed here are available for immediate purchase. The following is a schedule of the remaining limited edition 1792 reproductions and their release dates.
September 1, 2004: 1792 Quarter dollar uniface die trials struck in pewter (pair.) 1792 Quarter dollar struck in copper.
October 1, 2004: 1792 Half Disme struck in copper. 1792 Disme struck in copper.
November 1, 2004: 1792 Birch Cent GWP Variety struck in pewter.
   Struck in pewter, this is a reproduction of a unique Birch Cent that features a G.W.P. on the reverse that stands for "George Washington, President." Struck from a different set of dies than our currently available Birch Cent repro. Prices are not yet known on the remaining limited edition pieces, but please know in advance, even if you do not receive a notification by mail, these pieces will be released on dates posted on a first-come, first served basis.
Gallery Mint Museum, POBox706, EurekaSprings, AR 72632 HomePage EMail 1-888-558-6468 Fax:1-479-253-5056

7/24
2004
2004 "Mercury Dime" In High Relief
   Fantasy Piece is Larger than Life... We saved the best for last. Dated 2004, this fantasy piece is an ultra high relief striking of Adolf Weinman抯 Winged Liberty design that graced our nation抯 dimes from 1916 to 1945. Better known as the "Mercury" Dime, the wings on the Liberty cap were meant to symoblize freedom of thought, but is reminiscent of Mercury, the messenger of gods in Roman Mythology.
   This design is arguably the best ever to grace that denomination because of it抯 classic appeal. Gallery Mint抯 version is not a direct reproduction, but slightly larger than a standard dime, struck in .999 silver and very thick due to the extreme relief. It features a reeded edge and will be struck through the year of 2004.
Gallery Mint Museum, POBox706, EurekaSprings, AR 72632 HomePage EMail 1-888-558-6468 Fax:1-479-253-5056

7/24
2004
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Museum Project Well Underway
   Your Support is Still Needed... We've been working toward building a working museum of minting technology since the inception of Gallery Mint Museum in 1992. We have recently designed a new facility which is actually the first phase in the total museum structure.
   Since making a similar statement in our last Collectors' Update, many of you have stepped up to the plate by making additional purchases, buying from the Benefit Auction (the second benefit auction will be held soon), or by making cash donations. Our hat is off to all of you. Thank you for your support and encouraging letters. Though much more is needed, we would like to acknowledge those who have donated cash thus far... they are (in alphabetical order):
Steve Adams,   Ed Akre,   William Alberts,   John Gray Anderson,   Robert Archinal,   Dean Beckley,   Bob Dednarski,   Craig Blackstone,   William Bost,   Robert Cheek,   Wayne Chum,   Thomas Colangelo,   Roy Cothran,   Craig Currie,   Francis Cyrus,   Roy Fischer,   Bill Fivaz,   Lee Fowler,   Daniel Freeland,   Peter Fritz,   George Gardner,   Joseph Gast,   Tom Gormly,   Jerry Griffen,   Ed Hall,   Tomaka Harano,   William Henry,   Robert Hickox,   Bill Hokanson,   Roy Iwata,   Virgil Jacob,   William & Patsy Jameson,   Al Jennings,   Edwin Johnston,   Alan Katzeff,   Kendall Keller,   Lowell Kessler,   Steve Kriner,   Albert Kute,   Louis Landi,   John Larson,   Virgil Lippold,   Dan Luparello,   William Manion,   Paul Marzec,   Willie Massey,   George Mavrelos,   James Monn,   Bruce Newrock,   B.R. Nickell,   Robert Ottek,   Original Hobo Nickel Society,   Ozark Coin Club,   James Pfeffer,   George Prica,   Tim Pruzmack,   Ginger Raspus,   Galen Richie,   Gary Rosner,   Thomas Savell,   David Schartz,   Richard Sewell,   John Sheldon,   Rita Jean Sledz,   T. Smith,   James Spangler,   Bruce Spence,   Edwin Strellow,   Charles Stressler,   Michael Sussman,   Terry Tarver,   Carl Thomas,   Jim Trent,   Richard Uhrich,   Wayne Vaughn,   Ron Waddell,   Ted Wait,   Verne & Caroline Walrafen,   James Warmer,   Herbert Wave,   Kenneth Wehde,   Fred Wilson,   James Witherington,   Tom Woodward,   Keith Young
Gallery Mint Museum, POBox706, EurekaSprings, AR 72632 HomePage EMail 1-888-558-6468 Fax:1-479-253-5056

7/13
2004
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Continental Dollars and Bar Cents Available!
   Now available is one of GMM's most commonly requested reproductions; Pattern Continental Currency. More commonly referred to as the Continental Dollar with specimens known in a multitude of metals, these are unquestionably one of the most commonly reproduced or counterfeited of all U. S. numismatic items. Almost all of them are cast in a white metal. So, with hundreds of thousands of fakes on the market, why would we choose to reproduce this popular and historical pattern coin? Quality - plain and simple. Not any of the aforementioned reproductions display any quality at all. Since we do it the old fashioned way we can and have created a quality reproduction in coin silver (approximately 90% silver in content) of silver dollar size and a pewter (soft, white metal) silver dollar size reproduction. Both pieces feature an attractive twin olive leaf motif similar to the original Continental Dollars applied around the edge with a hand cranked edge mill.
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   Of nearly equal historical significance to the Continental Currency is the reproduction Bar Cent. Though somewhat of a mystery due to the incredible similarity between these and the buttons found on the jacket of the Continental Army soldiers; we cannot be certain if these were designed to be circulating coinage or if they just caught on with the public. We do know from the following New Jersey Gazette excerpt of November 12, 1785 that they were used as money and had we not begun to produce other means of coinage when we did the actual buttons could have soon become an acceptable form or coinage! "A new and curious kind of coppers have lately made their appearances in New York. The novelty and bright gloss of which keeps them in circulation. These coppers are in fact similar to the Continental buttons without eyes; on the one side are thirteen stripes and on the other U.S.A. as was usual on the soldiers buttons. If Congress does not take the establishment of a Mint into consideration and carry it into effect it is probable that the next coin which may come into circulation, as we have a variety of them, will be the soldiers old pewter buttons, for they are nearly as variable as the coppers above described and hardly so plenty."
   The 1782 version of the Great Seal of the United States represents the original 13 colonies as stripes though eased by alternating red and white stripes. These stripes are represented by the bar device on the reverse of the Bar Cents. Mike Ellis and the rest of the GMM Staff... Tuesday, 7/13/2004 3:06PM.
   Please forgive me! I've been fishing in Ontario and have just attended the 2004 ANA Summer Seminar in Colorado Springs... thus the gap in posting anything to our GMM ScrapBook website. It sure is nice to see new products being generated by GMM! THANKS GUYS! EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

5/5
2004
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Landis 2004 GNA Demonstration Carving
   There isn't much to say about this carving except that Ron Landis did it as a demonstration piece at a recent coin convention in Georgia... certainly not the best environment to produce his most elegant work. I am pleased to have it none-the-less since Ron has really tapered off on his production of nickel carvings in recent years. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen

5/4
2004
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Mini-MiniMint... PlanchetPunch ~ CastaingMachine ~ ScrewPress
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Mini-MiniMint Equipment and Tokens
   I knew that this set of minting equipment models was in TheGuy's display case at their museum in Eureka Springs but I didn't know that they were working models and that they actually had been used to strike tokens. Joe built the Mini-MiniMint set just as he does everything else around GMM! I had never seen any Mini-Mini dies either so I had no clue these Joe Rust creations were functional. Knowing Joe I should have realized that such would be the case!
   Mike Ellis stumbled over some "odd" little tokens while scratching around for material to offer us in Auction2. Here is what he had to say about these COOL tokens: These are actual tokens struck on GMM's Mini-MiniMint. That is the little wood models we have in our showcase. The MintMaster says they are only for the archives but they sure were fun to find! Found the entire hoard in 3 different places! The punched (dished) blank is 7mm. The gold and others that went through the upset mill are 6.5mm. One is 1/50th of an ounce of gold! One is a pewter 1992 Texas Numismatic Association token and another is a reeded edge, uniface, Royal Mint token struck in both pewter and silver. Talk about rare! And, we do not intend to strike anything else with the tiny models. I'm not even sure if we have good dies for it any longer. I'm sending these scans to you because I'm sure the readers will love it! I'll see if I can send you some pictures of the Mini-MiniMint as well. Mike Ellis... Monday, 5/3/2004 12:19PM
   I'm glad these tokens will stay in the GMM archives... TheGuys shouldn't let loose of all of their heritage material. The small financial gain just isn't worth it. as you can see Mike kept his promise and sent us scans of the Mini-MiniMint equipment. In the background is one of the two one and a half ton screw presses TheGuys take on the road with them. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
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U.S. Buffalo Nickel HoboTokens (21.2mm) are shown for size/scale comparison.

4/18
2004
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V-Dubya's Latest Puzzle
   Last year in August I reported the existence of a silver trial strike, shown below, from Ron's 1997 demonstration C.O.A.C. die created at an ANS conference. That SBsubject was entitled: Link:Coinage Of The Americas Conference. Until I saw the Auction1 lots this year I was blissfully unaware of the existance of any other strikes from that die. It was my good fortune to win this wonderful copper trial strike in Auction1. You will note that on the copper planchet, which is 7% smaller than the silver planchet, the AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY legend just barely makes it completely on the planchet.
   My puzzle is that, while building this SBsubject, I looked closely at the two specimens and the eagle and legends are definitely identical in my judgement ...BUT... the date appears distinctly different. I realize that there can be striking differences between two dissimilar metals with differing striking pressures. If that were the case then there should be additional differences between the two specimens other than just the date.
   I have difficulty imagining any reason for Ron to do this trial strike in copper after returning to Arkansas and then to strengthen the date on the die prior to doing the trial strike in silver. The only thing I can think of is that perhaps he was producing a silver specimen to send to ANS. Maybe one of you readers knows what ANS has in their cabinet and could tell us what's up. EMail:Verne R. Walrafen
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